Tag Archives: data breach

Breach Brief – Government Payment Service Inc.

Government Payment Service Inc, doing business as GovPayNow.com has suffered a data breach reaching back to 2012. The service accepts online payments for over 2,300  local governments in 35 states. It handles payments for court-ordered fines, traffic tickets and licensing fees. KrebsonSecurity.com reported that more than 14 million customer records may have been compromised.   Names, addresses, phone numbers and the last four digits of credit cards is among the compromised data.

Notified of the leak by KrebsOnSecurity.com, GovPayNow.com learned that records could be accessed by manipulating the digits in the web address displayed by each receipt. The payment site released a statement saying it had corrected a “potential issue,” adding while there was “no indication that any improperly accessed information was used to harm any customer” the company has updated its systems to prevent the situation from repeating itself.

According to GovPayNow.com the information is public record and can accessed by other methods.

 

 

Breach Brief – T-Mobile

Mobile phone service provider T-Mobile has announced a data breach of its customer information.

According to a post on  the carrier’s website  the hack was discovered on August 20 by its cybersecurity team. The team shut down unauthorized access to certain information and T-Mobile quickly reported the incident to authorities. T-Mobile reported that the attackers did not get access to financial information, social security numbers, or passwords. However  the company did admit that some personal information may have been compromised including name, billing zip code, phone number, email address, account number and account type.

In a statement T-Mobile said, “Out of an abundance of caution, we wanted to let you know about an incident that we recently handled that may have impacted some of your personal information. We take the security of your information very seriously and have a number of safeguards in place to protect your personal information from unauthorized access. We truly regret that this incident occurred and are so sorry for any inconvenience this has caused you.”

T-Mobile did not report any exact number of customers affected by the breach.  But a spokesperson for the company told Motherboard that it impacted roughly  “3 percent” of its 77 million customers amounting to around two million people. “Fortunately not many,” the spokesperson said in a text message, adding she could not say the exact number, reported Motherboard.

T-Mobile is the third largest cell service provider in the U.S. with 77 million customers. The company has about half the customers of Verizon and AT&T  with 152 million and 147 million customers respectively.

Breach Brief – Macy’s, Adidas

Macy’s department stores has reported a data breach of customer data. The breach affects Macy’s online customers and exposed names, addresses, phone numbers, email addresses, birthdays, and credit and debit card numbers with expiration dates. Macy’s pointed out that it does not store credit verification values (CVV) or Social Security numbers in its online customer profiles. Macy’s has reported the data breach and exposed card numbers to payment processors Visa, MasterCard, American Express and Discover. Macy’s has not said how many customers are impacted.

According to Macy’s the breach took place between April 26 and June 12. The company reported that an “unauthorized third party” had obtained usernames and passwords and were able to log into Macy’s and subsidiary’s Bloomingdale’s shopper’s online profiles. It is not known how the hackers got the information. Macy’s reported the breach in a letter to the New Hampshire Attorney General’s Office on July 2nd.

Macy’s has frozen any customer profiles with suspicious activity until the customers change their passwords.

“We have investigated the matter thoroughly, addressed the cause and, as a precaution, have implemented additional security measures,” the company said in a statement. “Macy’s, Inc. will provide consumer protection services at no cost to those customers. We have contacted potentially impacted customers with more information about these services.”

 

Adidas

Adidas, maker of sportswear and equipment, issued a warning to online shoppers in the U.S. that their personal information may have been compromised as a result a suspected data breach.  Adidas first became aware of the incident on June 26 and analysts are saying that potentially millions of customers could be affected.

A preliminary investigation revealed that the hacker may have stolen customer’s contact information, usernames and encrypted passwords. Adidas does not believe any credit card or health and fitness information was compromised.

A statement on Adidas’ website read; “According to the preliminary investigation, the limited data includes contact information, usernames and encrypted passwords. Adidas has no reason to believe that any credit card or fitness information of those consumers was impacted.” The company is in the process of notifying affected customers.

Breach Brief – Exactis

Who is Exactis and what do they know about me? That is the question you need to be asking.  No, you haven’t heard of Exactis but they may have exposed some of your most personal information to hackers. You, along and the everybody else in the U.S.

Exactis is a major data gathering company based in Palm Coast, FL. The Exactis website describes the company as a compiler and aggregator of business and consumer data. Exactis claims to have a store of information it refers to as a “universal data warehouse” that contains 3.5 billion consumer, business and digital records. Exactis claims these records are updated monthly. According to Exactis’ LinkedIn profile it is a privately owned company with only 10 employees. Exactis gathers this information from cookies on personal computers. credit and debit transaction records and other sources.

Now you should ask what do they know about me? The exposed records contains more than 400 different characteristics that include whether the person smokes, what their religion is and whether they have dogs or cats. But, according to Wired.com some of the information is inaccurate or outdated.

Your next question is; how did this happen? According to security researcher Vinny Troia the company leaked the data of 340 million individuals by storing it on an unsecured server accessible through the internet. According to Wired.com Troia discovered what he describes nearly two terabytes of data. 

Troia reported the data breach to both Exactis and the FBI. Exactis reacted by securing the data so that it’s no longer accessible.

But now ask; did criminals know this? Did they access the information? The answer to that question is unknown. But since Exactis has not admitted to the data breach and it is no longer accessible no one really know how many people are affected. According to Wired.com Troia found two versions of the database each holding an estimated 340 million records. This number breaks down into 230 million consumers records  and 110 million on business contacts.  

But Marc Rotenberg, the executive director of the non-profit Electronic Privacy Information Center said,  “The likelihood of financial fraud is not that great , but the possibility of impersonation or profiling is certainly there. Rotenberg stated that while some of the data is available in public records, much of it appears to be the sort of non-public information that data brokers aggregate from sources like magazine subscriptions, credit card transaction data sold by banks, and credit reports. “A lot of this information is now routinely gathered on American consumers,” Rotenberg adds.

 

 

Breach Brief – Ticketfly, MyHeritage

Concert ticketing service Ticketfly reported last week that it was hit by a major data breach involving the personal information of 26 million customers.

According to Ticketfly “some customer information has been compromised including names, addresses, emails, and phone numbers.” Tech news blog Engadget reported that the hacker behind the attack has uploaded much of the data to a public server and is threatening to release more.

Prior to the breach Ticketfly was warned of a flaw in its systems by the hacker. According to Motherboard.com the hacker notified Ticketfly then requested a ransom of one bitcoin in exchange for a fix. When the ransom was not paid as requested Ticketfly suffered the consequences.

Ticketfly has not said if customer’s credit card information and passwords has been compromised. However, the hacker has threatened to release more information if the ransom is not paid.

At the time this article was written the website is back online. Ticketfly is owned by San Francisco based Eventbrite.

MyHeritage.com

 

 

 

MyHeritage, an Israeli based genealogy and DNA testing service, has suffered a major data breach of its user information. According to a MyHeritage statement over 92 million customer account details were found on a server outside of MyHeritage. The data is that of of people who signed up to use the service right up to the day of the breach, October 26, 2017.

MyHeritage stated that the chief information security officer “received a message from a security researcher that he had found a file named myheritage containing email addresses and hashed password, on a private server.” Hashed passwords are encrypted representations of passwords. This means companies don’t have to store the actual password on their network but, depending on the algorithm used, hackers could still crack them.

MyHeritage claims that no other user data, such as credit cards, were compromised and DNA data are stored separate systems.

Breach Brief – Chili’s

Popular restaurant chain Chili’s has issued a statement reporting a data breach of its payments system. According to the statement Chili’s became aware of the breach on May 11th of this year and admitted that some customer’s payment information was compromised. The data breach is believed to impact patrons who ate at the chain between March and April of 2018.  Chili’s is owned by Dallas-based Brinker International, Inc.

The breach is believed to have been carried out by malware inserted into payment systems that gathered payment information including credit and debit card numbers as well as cardholder names. The company has not specified which of its 1,600 locations were affected by the data breach or how many customers are impacted.

Officials of the restaurant chain have contacted both law enforcement and third-party forensic experts as part of the investigation. Chili’s reports it’s trying to provide fraud resolution and credit monitoring services for affected customers and it will share more information as it becomes available. The company will notify customers affected by the breach and plan to offer free identity theft protection services through ID Expert’s MyIDCare. The company is advising customers to be vigilant for possible fraudulent charges on their credit or debit cards and for indications  of identity theft.

Brinker International also owns Italian eatery Maggiano’s which is unaffected by the breach.

Breach Brief – SunTrust Bank

SunTrust Bank has reported a data breach that may have compromised the personal information of up to 1.5 million customers. According to reports the bank believes a former employee may have stolen customer information to give to a criminal third party.

SunTrust first became aware of improper access to customer records in February. An internal investigation implicated the ex-employee for the alleged theft. According to the Wall Street Journal the employee tried to print the records and share them with a “criminal third party.”

According to SunTrust the names, addresses, phone numbers and account balances of 1.5 million customers were breached. However the bank does not believe that Social Security numbers, account numbers, passwords, and driver’s license information were accessed. SunTrust also stated that there’s no indication that fraudulent activity has occurred with the affected accounts.

The bank has begun  the process of contacting customers whose info may have been compromised. SunTrust is also planing to provide free identity protection to all its customers whether they have been impacted by the breach or not. 

SunTrust customers can go to this website to see if they are affected by the breach.

The incident is under investigation and the bank continues to work closely with law enforcement and outside experts.

Breach Brief – Best Buy, Delta, Sears, K-Mart

Delta Airlines, Sears, Kmart and Best Buy and others have all been hit with a data breach that is connected with  Indian Company [24]7.ai. According to a statement from the company, it “discovered and contained an incident potentially affecting the online customer payment information of a small number of our client companies, and affected clients have been notified.”  The incident took place Sept. 26 and was finally shut down on Oct. 12, 2017. The company has notified notified law enforcement.

[24]7.ai claims the breach affected a small number of clients but, in reality, that small number contains some the biggest, most well known, companies in the U.S. and the world.

[24]7.ai is a third party vendor that provides online and mobile chat services. According to CNET in addition to the above mentioned companies other big name companies potentially impacted by the breach include Hilton, AT&T, Citi, American Express, eBay and Farmers Insurance. Both American Express and Farmers Insurance have confirmed they were unaffected by the breach.

According to Sears, owners of K-Mart, unauthorized access to customer payment information was limited to less than 100,000 of its customer’s credit card information. Sears says there was no evidence that stores were compromised or that any internal Sears systems were inappropriately accessed.

Delta airlines, among the worlds largest, reported that certain customer payment information may have been accessed but denied other customer personal information, such as passport, government ID, security or SkyMiles information was impacted. “As best we can tell, only a small fraction of our overall online customer population could have been caught up in this [24]7.ai incident, whether or not they used the chat function.”  But Delta also stated that it can’t confirm if customer data was actually compromised. Delta is continuing its investigation and has launched a dedicated website to provide the latest developments to customers.

Delta stated that software used by [24]7.ai may have exposed the payment information of as many as several hundred thousand customers using Delta’s PC-accessed website. The company is especially concerned because customers didn’t have to interact with the chat tool to be hit by the hack.

According to Delta customer information compromised includes names, addresses, payment card numbers, CVV numbers, and expiration dates. Customers using the Delta’s Wallet service are considered safe as the malware could only grab information entered on the screen. Delta Wallet “masks” this sensitive information.

Electronic retailers Best Buy also acknowledged  it was hit by the same data breach related to [24]7.ai. In a blog post Best Buy said that [24]7.ai  had informed the company that an “illegal intrusion” had occurred between September 27 and October 12, 2017. Best Buy says it will inform affected customers directly and they will not be liable for fraudulent charges. It will also offer free credit monitoring.

 

 

Breach Brief – Panera Bread, Saks Fifth Avenue, Orbitz

Panera, a popular bakery-cafe has admitted its website was leaking a data. According to Brian Krebs of KrebsOnSecurity.com Panera allegedly failed to fix issues with its website it knew about for nearly eight months. Panera Bread has  has over 2,100 outlets nationwide. 

Cyber security researcher Dylan Houlihan notified the company of a data leak in early August 2017. Mike Gustavison, Panera director of information security was informed of the flaw and said the company “working on a resolution.” Despite this statement the flaw was not repaired. 

Data records that leaked out contain the names, email and physical addresses, birth dates and the last four digits of the credit card numbers of Panera customers. 

Only after Krebs spoke directly with Panera chief information officer John Meister was the site shut down briefly and the data secured.  The number of customers whose data may have been compromised is estimated at 37 million.

A statement from Panera Bread said; “Panera takes data security very seriously and this issue is resolved. Following reports today of a potential problem on our website, we suspended the functionality to repair the issue. Our investigation is continuing, but there is no evidence of payment card information nor a large number of records being accessed or retrieved.”

The company urges its customers to alert for any fraudulent activity in the bank or credit accounts.

Saks Fifth Avenue/Lord & Taylor

Saks Fifth Avenue and Lord & Taylor reported a data breach affecting millions of its customers.

According to the company “a well-known ring of cybercriminals” had stolen more than 5 million credit and debit card numbers from customers. According to the New York Times the cyber criminals were able to pull off this massive heist by implanting software into the cash register systems.

Although it is early in the investigation the the hack appears to have only affected card numbers and not social security or driver’s license numbers.

The majority of the affected credit cards appear to have been used at Saks and Lord & Taylor stores between May 2017 and March 2018 and only in the New York-New Jersey areas stores. 

Both Saks 5th Ave. and Lord & Taylor are owned by the Canadian company Hudson’s Bay. The company issued the following statement;“We have become aware of a data security issue involving customer payment card data at certain Saks Fifth Avenue, Saks Off 5th and Lord & Taylor stores in North America. We have identified the issue, and have taken steps to contain it. Once we have more clarity around the facts, we will notify our customers quickly and will offer those impacted free identity protection services, including credit and web monitoring.”

Orbitz

The popular travel booking site Orbitz announced that its legacy site, Amextravel.com, was compromised due to a data breach.  Data of  880,000 customers was compromised from January 1, 2016 through December 22, 2017.

According to the company credit or debit card information was stolen along with personal information that includes the customer’s full name, date of birth, phone number, email address, physical and/or billing address and gender.  

Orbitz plans to notify all customers who’s information may have been compromised and  is providing potential victims a free year of credit monitoring services. Customers can contact Orbitz for the free service either online or by calling 855-828-3959 toll-free. 

 

Breach Brief – Under Armour

Athletic equipment maker Under Armour has reported that 150 million users of its MyFitnessPal fitness and nutrition app and website have been affected by a data security breach.

According to the company the MyFitnessPal team discovered the breach on March 25  and the culprit had gained unauthorized access to user accounts in February.

Under Armour reported that their investigation revealed that the compromised information includes usernames, email addresses and hashed passwords. Payment card data and government-issued identifiers are unaffected because the company stores that data separately.

UnderArmour notified MyFitnessPal users through email and app notifications on Thursday.

Users of the app are urged to change their passwords immediately. Under Armour said in statement that it is working with data security firms and law enforcement to investigate.